Tag: post pregnancy weight loss

Explore, Educate and Eat

| August 3, 2013

Food education is at the forefront of most parents’ minds and is fast becoming a core subject on the school curriculum. I am not surprised there is so much focus on teaching nutrition to children from a young age. Children who learn about food and nutrition are more likely to make healthy food choices and eat fruit and vegetables.

The best and most simple way to get your children thinking about food and nutrition is to get them involved. Here are some simple, daily activities you can do with your children to expand their knowledge about food and make learning fun.

Start with fruit and vegetables

Buy a selection of both and play simple question and answer games that your children will find interesting and educational. What is it? How is it grown? Where does it come from? Could you grow it in your garden or on an allotment?

fruit and vegetables

Experiment

During the week sit down and eat each fruit and vegetable with your children. Talk about whether you can eat it fresh or if it needs to be cooked first. What does it taste like? What colour is it? Ask your children to come up with as many meal ideas as they can that include this fruit or vegetable.

Go green

An easy and engaging project is to try growing fruit, vegetables and herbs with your children. Even if you’re not green fingered, give it a go! All children love to be outside and will learn from the experience of growing something they can eat, plus you could save money growing your own.

Visit a Farmer’s Market

Have a family day out and let your children discover where food comes from and how it is grown. Talk to the growers about their produce and sample the fresh food on offer.

Create

Involve your children in the preparation of their lunch box using fresh ingredients. Cook simple meals and get your children to help where they can, even if they’re simply watching you and talking about what you’re doing. Sit down as a family and enjoy your home cooked food together.

Explore nutrition

Teach your children about the importance of nutrition for a healthy mind and body. Explain why fresh is best.

If you follow these simple steps your children will soon start to take a keen interest in fresh foods and helping you to prepare and cook meals. Regular interaction with food as part of your everyday home life will encourage children to make the right choices for their health.

mummy and me magazineLydia Oliver – Nutritional Advisor Only Best For Baby

This article was published in the August 2013 edition of Mummy and Me Magazine

I offer one to one nutrition programmes for breastfeeding, post pregnancy weight loss, weaning, weight management and health. Contact me.

National Childhood Obesity Awareness Week

| July 1, 2013

The first week of July is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Week. It is a time when leading organisations aim to highlight the impacts of childhood obesity and request the Government take action to focus on reducing obesity in children, for the health of our nation.

Awareness of childhood obesity and the risks it brings can help parents make better choices for their children. There is a much greater chance that overweight children will become overweight adults, when compared to children who maintain a normal weight throughout adolescence.

Childhood obesity heightens the risk of serious illnesses during childhood and increases the risk of developing long-term health conditions such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and several types of cancer.

mummy and me magazine

As a parent there is plenty that you can do to help your child maintain a healthy weight with the support of healthcare professionals and schools. Many teaching institutions now provide an environment where your child can learn about nutrition and health.

Healthy living starts at home and children learn first and foremost from their parents.

Here are some easy ways to assist your child to achieve a healthy weight:

1. Monitor your child’s weight. The ‘red book’ you are given when your baby is born contains useful charts for reviewing your child’s weight, height and development. Always seek professional help if you are concerned about any aspect of your child’s health and development.

2. Encourage your child to exercise and have fun outdoors every day.

3. Feed your child a healthy diet high in vegetables, fruit and unprocessed foods. Minimise the amount of packaged food, fresh is best.

4. Enjoy food in moderation and limit sweet treats to special occasions.

5. Have fun teaching your child about nutritious foods and show them how to cook healthy meals so they are prepared to make the best choices in life.

6. Be a role model for your child and encourage physical activity and healthy eating.

If your child is overweight, you can do something about it. The earlier you act the sooner your child will reap the health benefits, both mentally and physically.

mummy and me magazineLydia Oliver – Nutritional Advisor Only Best For Baby

This article was published in the July 2013 edition of Mummy and Me Magazine

I offer one to one nutrition programmes for breastfeeding, post pregnancy weight loss, weaning, weight management and health. Contact me.

Wobbles When Weaning

| April 9, 2013

Before long you will have mastered the art of weaning your baby with pureed fruit and vegetables. After a couple of months of puree your baby will be ready for the next stage of weaning, eating foods with more texture.

Adding texture is an important stage in weaning and development for your baby. It helps to strengthen jaw muscles, encourages the development of speech, helps to ensure healthy teeth and prepares your baby for chewing food and eating family meals.

The best advice I received when I was introducing texture to my baby was to take things slowly. There’s no need to get anxious or frustrated if your baby spits out the lumpy bits or refuses textured food altogether.

You may find your baby takes to textured food straight away or it could be some time before your baby is happy chewing and swallowing lumpier food. Either way, there are things you can do to help make this next stage of weaning as easy as possible for both you and your baby.

Mummy and Me Weaning

Tips for the Smooth Introduction of Texture

1. Until your baby is at least ten months old they should be able to easily mush any lumps in their mouth, with or without teeth.

Lumps in food need to be small, soft and manageable for your baby.

2. Begin by slowly adding texture to the foods your baby likes.

Introducing texture to your baby’s puree will most likely be met with a surprised face! You can start by adding grated fruit, mashed vegetable or finely chopped food to your baby’s puree which is a subtle way of encouraging your baby to eat thicker and lumpier food. Introduce new food textures one at a time.

3. Keep baby interested in texture.

When your baby is happy with some texture you can start to vary the texture you give by adding baby pasta shapes or grains such as couscous into their favourite meals.

4. Offer your baby finger foods if they’re developmentally ready.

Babies will often eat lumpier foods if they’re feeding themselves.

5. Don’t force your baby to try something if they don’t want to.

The key is to keep things relaxed and fun so your baby looks forward to mealtimes. This helps to avoid fussy eaters later on.

Initially, I found my baby was happy to eat food with a thicker consistency but she didn’t enjoy food with lumps in it. She would spit the lumps out or refuse to try what I was offering. I took my time and continued to give her food with texture for several weeks until one day she just ate the spoonful of lumpy food as if it were the most normal thing to do!

mummy and me magazineLydia Oliver – Nutritional Advisor Only Best For Baby

This article was published in the April 2013 edition of Mummy and Me Magazine

I offer one to one nutrition programmes for breastfeeding, post pregnancy weight loss, weaning, weight management and health. Contact me.